Class timetables are released as early as possible to let you plan your studies and the year ahead.

Semester 1 timetables will be published on Monday, 10 December 2018.

Whether you're planning your timetable for the semester, or for the entire academic year, some important things to consider are:

1. Semester, trimester, teaching period or medical rotation?

When you click on each course in your course list, you can see whether it’s offered in a semester, trimester, teaching period (TP) or medical rotation (MR).

Semesters

An academic year at UQ has three semesters: Semester 1, Semester 2, and Summer Semester (optional for most programs).

Semester 1 and Semester 2 are usually 13 weeks long and Summer Semester is usually eight weeks.

Pay careful attention to your course list – some courses aren't offered every semester or every year.

When you view a course profile, go to ‘Learning Activities’. This will show you the exact dates when a course is taught.

See an example from the catalogue


Trimesters

If you're studying the Associate Degree in Business at UQ College, your academic year is split into three trimesters. Each trimester usually runs for 14 weeks, with a break in between.

Pay careful attention to your course list – some courses aren’t offered every trimester. 

When you view a course profile, go to ‘Learning Activities’. This will show you the exact dates when a course is taught.

See an example from the catalogue


Teaching period

Most courses are taught during semesters, but a small number are taught in non-standard teaching periods (TP).

An academic year has eight teaching periods, running from the beginning of January (TP1) to the end of December (TP8).

Teaching periods run on different schedules to semesters. While semesters are usually 13 weeks long, teaching periods are between four and eight weeks long.

Pay careful attention to your course list – a course may be offered in a teaching period or in a standard semester.

When you view a course profile, go to ‘Learning Activities’. This will show you the exact dates when a course is taught.

See an example from the catalogue


Medical rotations

Medical rotations are only for Phase 2 Doctor of Medicine students who are completing their clinical placements.

An academic year has five medical rotations (MR), running from the beginning of January (MR1) to late November (MR5). Each rotation is eight weeks long.

The Faculty of Medicine will provide MD students with more information about medical rotations in Phase 2 of the program.

See an example from the catalogue


2. Does this course have unique dates?

Some course dates diverge from semester schedules.

We recommend checking the course date variation tables to see whether your course has unique dates.

See course date variations

3. What day, what time and where?

Use the UQ Timetable Planner to see class times and venues.

It's important to remember that Timetable Planner is just a planning tool. You aren't guaranteed a spot in any class until you officially enrol and sign-on.

To view all class venues and times for a course, first choose the correct semester from the drop-down menu, then:

  1. Enter the course code
  2. Click the 'Add Course' button
  3. Click on each class type to view other times and venues.

See an example

Class venues appear below the course code on each class entry and use the format 'building number'–'room number'. You can search for building numbers, names and locations on UQ Maps.

For class times, remember:

Some courses have two or more linked classes each week. If there are multiple timetable entries for the same group number, you have to attend all classes (i.e. attend all L01 lectures, all L02 lectures, all L03 lectures, etc.) Class groups will be numbered in sequential order (e.g. two or more L01 classes, two or more L02 classes, two or more L03 classes, etc.) Choose one group number and attend all classes. Linked classes turn green simultaneously on Timetable Planner.

See an example


Some courses offer the same class at different times. If there is only one time scheduled for a group number, you only have to attend one class. Class groups will be numbered in sequential order (e.g. P01, P02, P03, P04 etc.) – choose one group number and attend the one scheduled class time.

See an example


Attend all times when the only class offered has the number 01 attached. You don't have a choice of class group. Attend all times for 01-numbered classes.

See an example

Problems with Timetable Planner?

4. Class sign-on

When a course has lots of options for class times, you may need to sign-on (i.e. you may need to sign up for a specific class at a specific time).

Class sign-on usually happens about three to four weeks before semester begins.

When drafting your timetable, make a shortlist of two or three preferred times for each class.

Classes fill up quickly and sign-on is competitive – it’s best to have several possibilities on hand when the sign-on window opens.

See Enrolment and Class Sign-on for more information.

5. Timetables can change

Timetables are subject to change, especially during the first two weeks of semester.

Enrolment numbers may affect which rooms a course is taught in (and room availability may affect what time a course can be offered).

Check your mySI-net timetable regularly for changes to course times and room allocations, particularly during the first two weeks of semester.

To save space, timetable information is often presented used abbreviations, codes or unique terminology. Here's what they mean:

A

Academic career

This refers to the academic level of a course (e.g. undergraduate, postgraduate coursework etc.)

B

Building name

The building where the class is held. To find your way around campus, download the UQNav app or use the UQ maps database.

Building number

The building number where the class is held. All campus buildings are numbered.

C

Campus/location

The primary location where a course is taught. Not all classes are taught from this location (e.g. practicals, clinical-based learning, industry placements etc.)

Class

All the classes offered in a course. Classes are usually abbreviated with a combination of one letter and two numbers.

The letter represents the type of class and the numbers represents the group number (e.g. T01 is tutorial group 1, T02 is tutorial group 2 etc.)

For class times, remember:

Some courses have two or more linked classes each week. If there are multiple timetable entries for the same group number, you have to attend all classes (i.e. attend all L01 lectures, all L02 lectures, all L03 lectures, etc.) Class groups will be numbered in sequential order (e.g. two or more L01 classes, two or more L02 classes, two or more L03 classes, etc.) Choose one group number and attend all classes.


Some courses offer the same class at different times. If there is only one time scheduled for a group number, you only have to attend one class. Class groups will be numbered in sequential order (e.g. P01, P02, P03, P04 etc.) – choose one group number and attend the one scheduled class time.


Attend all times when the only class offered has the number 01 attached. You don't have a choice of class group. Attend all times for 01-numbered classes.

Class status

Courses marked "Active" are available for enrolment.

Course code

Each course taught at the University is allocated an eight-character code.

  • The four letters describe the course discipline (e.g. ANCH for ancient history, MICR for microbiology, PHTY for physiotherapy etc.)
  • The four numbers uniquely identify the course. The first number identifies the level of the course (e.g. first year, second year etc.) and the remaining numbers are used for administrative purposes.

Please pay close attention to the first number in a course code:

  • 1 ... first-level undergraduate
  • 2 ... second-level undergraduate
  • 3 ... third-level undergraduate
  • 4 ... fourth-level undergraduate
  • 5 ... fifth-level undergraduate 
  • 6 ... honours, graduate certificate or graduate diploma
  • 7 ... master's by coursework
  • 8 ... professional doctorate
  • 9 ... MPhil, PhD or higher doctorate.

Make sure you choose courses that are at an appropriate level – especially if you are selecting elective courses from a different discipline, or if you are in your first year.

Log in to mySI-net and click the 'Enrolments & Timetables' tile > 'Course & Timetable Info' to view a list of four-letter discipline abbreviations:

  1. Select an option from the 'Subject Area Code' drop-down menu
  2. The 'Subject Area Description' field will automatically fill-in the name of the discipline
 See an example

Contact hours (e.g. 2L2P)

Class contact hours are abbreviated with a combination of letters and numbers:

  • Numbers represent the amount of time, and
  • Letters represent the type of class.

For example: '2L2P' means two hours (2) of lectures (L) and two hours (2) of practical work (P) each week.

Other letters you might encounter include:

A Peer Assisted Study Session (PASS)
B Clinical-based learning
C General contact hours (e.g. group learning)
E Excursion
F Fieldwork
I Information technology session
L Lecture
M Placement
N Clinical hours
O Clinical coaching
P Practical (e.g. a laboratory or project work)
R Problem-based learning
S Seminar
T Tutorial
U Studio
W Workshop
X Exam

Coordinating unit

The University department responsible for administering the course.

The coordinating unit will usually be a school and the school's name is often abbreviated.

Pay close attention to school names. The school that administers a course will be different to the faculty that administers your program. During the semester you may need to contact your school.

Coordinator

This is the person who is primarily responsible for designing, planning and teaching a course.

Please note that course coordinators are responsible for teaching – they aren't responsible for administrative areas such as timetabling, or dropping a course, or academic progression.

Talk to administrative staff in your school office or faculty office about these areas.

D

Day

The day of the week when the class is held.

E

Enrolled

The number of students enrolled in a course. Courses with large enrolment numbers will have a greater number of classes timetabled in order to accommodate all students.

I

Instruction mode

The words "internal" and "external" refer to types of attendance at the University.

  • An internal course is offered on a campus
  • An external course is offered by distance education (e.g. online).

L

Location

The campus or other site where a class is held.

P

Prerequisites, companions and incompatibles

You can’t enrol in a course if you haven’t passed its prerequisites, or if you've studied an incompatible course:

  • Prerequisites are the assumed knowledge requirements for a course. They have to be completed before you enrol.
  • Two or more courses are incompatible if their content is very similar, or if it substantially overlaps.
  • Companions are a pair of courses (or a group of courses) that should be studied together. Companion courses can either be studied all together in the same semester, or in separate semesters (i.e. one companion can be studied before another).
  • See an example from the catalogue

R

Restrictions

This means a course is restricted to students who are enrolled in one of the listed programs.

Room

The room number where the class is held. The first digit typically refers to the floor number (e.g. room number 715 is on floor seven).

S

Semester offered

Some courses aren't offered each semester or each year. Check mySI-net or the program and course catalogue to confirm a course's availability for enrolment.

Sem 1 A course undertaken completely in Semester 1
Sem 2 A course undertaken completely in Semester 2
Sem 1 or 2 A course that may be undertaken in either semester
Int Internal
Ext External
NOT 2018 The course will not be offered in the specified year
Year A course undertaken over two semesters
Sum A course taught in Summer Semester

Session

The specific dates a course is taught. Courses may be offered during a standard Semester or a teaching period.

Session information also includes the Census Date for a course.

Start/End

A class's start time and finish time. Classes usually finish 10 minutes early, so you can get to your next class on time.

U

Units

Each course is rated in terms of units, which reflect the amount of effort required to complete it, including both class contact and private study.

A hashtag (#) is sometimes used to represent the word "unit". Most courses are 2 units (#2) each.

W

Weeks taught

The specific week numbers when a course is taught. Semester 1 and Semester 2 are usually 13 weeks long.

Consult the Academic Calendar to work out what week it is. Week 1 begins with the first day of classes (i.e. Orientation Week is not counted as Week 1).

Please note some courses are taught in non-standard teaching periods or in intensive mode – go to 'Session' for the exact dates a course is taught.