Course level

Undergraduate

Faculty

Humanities and Social Sciences

School

Humanities and Social Sciences

Units

2

Duration

One Semester

Class contact

2 Lecture hours, 1 Tutorial hour

Recommended prerequisite

Assessment methods

Critical Reflections (15%), Research Plan & Annotated Bibliography (25%), Group Presentation (30%), and Research Essay (30%)

Course coordinator

Dr Carlos Rivera Santana

Study Abroad

This course is pre-approved for Study Abroad and Exchange students.

Current course offerings

Course offerings Location Mode Course Profile
Semester 1, 2018 St Lucia Internal Profile unavailable

Please Note: Course profiles marked as not available may still be in development.

Course description

This course explores the interdisciplinary works of Indigenous Global South theorists and how these theories relate to Indigenous Southern theory in Australia. The main aim is to give students the opportunity to engage with the works of Global Indigenous perspectives in philosophy, social science, cultural studies and history and their relationship with Indigenous Australian interdisciplinary perspectives. The Indigenous/Southern perspectives will be the focus of the course, as conceptualised in coloniality/decolonial and Southern Theory. The course will first discuss postcolonial theory, coloniality/decolonial theory and southern theory drawing from the main works of Gayatri Spivak, Raewyn Connell, Martin Nakata, Walter Mignolo, Anibal Quijano and others. Then the course will show how philosophy, social sciences, cultural studies and history looks like from a decolonial and southern perspective. The course content will draw examples from the Indigenous/Southern perspectives of the Americas (Canada, Latin America and the United States), New Zealand and the Pacific region, South Asia/Indian Subcontinent and the African nations. Lastly the course will help students examine and critically reflect on how different Global Indigenous/Southern perspectives are evaluated in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australian perspectives in philosophy, cultural studies, social sciences and history. In the end the student should be able to produce an informed position on International Indigenous perspectives and its use in the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academic arena.

Archived offerings

Course offerings Location Mode Course Profile
Semester 1, 2017 St Lucia Internal Course Profile